Alphabetical Plant To-Do List

Don't forget to check out THIS MONTH's garden tips by clicking "Garden Tips" above!

Here is our "Plant To Do List" organized alphabetically.  It includes the month in which to take the action.  This is our 'secret formula' in which we have constructed over our 35  years in the business.  Our Garden View Landscape Maintenance crews follow these rules which is one of the reasons why our properties are a step above the rest!

We have fine tuned these tips for our area, Southern California's San Gabriel Valley.

ABUTILON (April): Abutilon
Abutilon takes pruning well. Tip prune young plants, to spur new growth and get a fuller shape. If yours starts to become tall and gangly, snipping it back to a leaf joint will encourage it to send out new branches. Abutilon can also be pruned back hard in the spring, if you want to control its size.

Abutilon is a heavy feeder. Keep up the fertilizer for maximum bloom.

PRUNE ACACIAS (November):
Cut back top heavy shrubs open up small trees. This is a fast growing, low water need plant. Most varieties have origins in Australia and southern Africa and most have yellow to gold flowers which bloom in late winter or early spring. These plants that are often listed as brittle and short lived (15 years) may have there life extended considerably by not overwatering and proper pruning.

ACACIA REDOLENS (November):
Acacias is a great dry hillside ground cover. It grows fast, so space each plant at least 4 feet apart from each other and away from v-ditch drainage swales. The dwarf varieties need a little less trimming. Garden View Landscape crews will often plant this shrub on the upper side of the slope and Rosemary prostrada on the downhill side. This makes a nice contrast between the plants and the Rosemary tolerates more of the percolated water.

Acacia Balileyana Tree ACACIA BALILEYANA (November)
has abundant flowers and a ferny leaf. As it matures and with proper pruning it can be a very mystic looking tree with interesting form.

Achillea Achillea - Yarrow (February) should only be cleaned up and not pruned severely.

Agapanthus AGAPANTHUS Lily of the Nile (September)
This is one of southern California’s favorite plants. It is a nice attractive strap leaf shrub most of the year with beautiful flowers in late spring and early summer and it is relatively water wise. In the full sun and extreme heat the leaves will often show some signs of fading Flaxor scorching especially where the leaves are bending. Not much can be done about this and it lasts only a month or two. Many FLAXES -Phormium (RIGHT) will also have the same reaction to extreme heat. It is best to leave the scorched leaves until the heat has passed as they are protecting the leaves underneath. Remove the dead leaves at the bottom of the plant as you would normally.

Agave striata SUCCULENTS (November):
stop watering once rain arrives; many varieties need protection from frost.

Angel's Trumpet ANGEL'S TRUMPET - Brugmansia (October) - MAINTENANCE/PRUNING:
Train a central leader when angel's trumpet is young if you would like to grow it in tree form.

The Brugmansia Growers International advises: "The best time to trim your plant is in the fall. Always keep at least 6-10 nodes on the branches above the Y for flowers the following year. It is the branches that are above the Y which will produce next year's flowers."

You don't really need to prune angel's trumpet at all unless it is getting in the way.

AnigozanthosKangaroo Paw (March/April) - Anigozanthos cut flowers to ground to prolong bloom (after you have deadheaded approximately half the flowers on the stalk)
Annual Flowers PLANT ANNUALS (February):
There is still time to set out annuals from nursery flats, six-packs, or 4” pots. Look for Calendula, Cineraria, Delphinium, Dianthus, English Daisies, Iceland Poppies, Lobelia, Stock, and Sweet Alyssum. If you are near the coast, Primroses, Pansies, and Violas are good choices.

FERTILIZING ANNUAL COLOR (November):
The best time to fertilize your annual flowers is when planting them. Garden View Crews sprinkle some fertilizer underneath the plant when planting. The reason is that Phosphorus and Potassium which contribute most to flower production do not leach through the soil so putting the fertilizer on the top of the soil doesn’t feed the plant near as well as putting the fertilizer in the hole next to the roots. Click Here to Read Our Article on Fertilizer!

Winter Colors PLANT WINTER ANNUALS-SPRING COLORS (October):
Set out soon, calendulas, pansies, Iceland poppies, and primroses could be blooming for the holidays. Also look for these in cell-packs or 4 inch pots; bedding begonias, candytuft, Chrysanthemum multicaule, C. paludosum, delphinium, dianthus, foxglove, lobelia, penstemon, phlox, snapdragon, stock, pansy and viola. Along the coast, include calceolaria, cineraria, nemesia, and schizanthus.

Artemesia Powis Castle Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ (February) should be pruned now.

Eugenia Disease AUSTRALIAN BRUSH CHERRY (June):
Eugenia myrtifolia (Syzygium paniculatum) is a very popular hedge and tree in Southern California. It is often plagued with psyllids. Infested plants often are not very attractive and leaves that have been infested and have been controlled will continue to have scars from the infestation (right).

To combat the pest, researchers looked for its natural enemies in Australia. They found a tiny parasitic wasp, genus Tamarixia, that is stingless and smaller than a pinhead. The wasp was evaluated in a quarantined facility and then released at Disneyland in Anaheim in July 1992, and at the San Diego Zoo in 1993.

Most native species of psyllids require no management; even when populations are abundant, plants can tolerate substantial feeding and psyllid populations will decline naturally.

In locations that are visible Garden View Maintenance crews will control the insect populations by pruning often to remove scared leaves. Spraying Orthene™ or Malathion™ will eliminate the pests but will probably discourage natural enemies though this is often necessary where the plant is very visible.

AVACODO TREES (September):
Don't be alarmed by a lot of leaf drop on mature plants. Avocados leaf litter nearly year round and are affected by the heat as described above. This is a normal condition. Be sure to keep a very thick blanket of mulch, compost or fallen leaves under mature avocadoes at all times. Avocadoes need a cool root-run for good health.

AVOCADOS (June): These trees need their second semi annual feeding. A mature tree needs 2.5 lbs of actual nitrogen so if you are using a 20-6-8 fertilizer you will need 2.5 divided by .2 which equals 12.5 lbs put around the drip line of the trees. (See explanation of formula in above citrus feeding)

Camellias AZALEAS AND CAMELLIAS (January) - Plant Transplant and Rejuvenate:
Azaleas and Camellias are at their peak now. Shop for the colors and forms that you want plant right away. Now is also the time to move established plants. Esteban (Garden View Maintenance Supervisor) says that struggling older azaleas can be rejuvenated by digging around the old root ball and adding sufficient quantities of peat moss in the soil.

PLANT AZALEAS AND CAMELLIAS (February):
Azalea Chlorosis Now is the best time to plant or transplant most varieties; the strongest growth comes just after the flowers have faded. Older Azaleas that have outgrown their planting hole and/or Azaleas that have serious signs of chlorosis (left) (a very common problem) that are not corrected by adding Iron may benefit from being dug up and replanted in a bed of 60% peat moss, 20% compost and 20% native soil. Be careful transplanting Camellias and don’t be too disappointed if they don’t survive the transplant; Garden View has not been very successful with transplanting them. Our success rate is about 40% survival.

PRUNING AZALEAS (May):
Pruning Azaleas should be undertaken immediately after they finish blooming (usually may through July). Major pruning of Azaleas later than that risks interfering with the development of next year's buds. Begin by pruning off dead or injured branches, which could cause disease and insect problems in the future. Then prune back tall, gangly limbs shooting out of the top of the bush. This will promote a more attractive, compact shape.

Before you start, look at the plant you intend to work on, remembering that branches which are shaded out often die back and become dead wood anyway. Remove these first, as the effect of removing them may alter the way you approach pruning the rest of the branches to maintain the shape of the bush. Garden View crews have found that Azaleas respond well to inside out pruning (see Garden View article on inside out pruning) by opening up the plant new growth emerges inside of the plant.

Pruning anytime of the year does not damage the plant: some pinching of Azaleas year round helps keep the plant compact, some blooms may be lost by pruning off new growth. Don’t over fertilize Azaleas. Some yellowing of leaves especially in the winter is common as leaves change old for new; in more severe cases check for chlorosis and/or check to see if the root system has out grown the nutrient base in the original planting hole. Azaleas have shallow roots, be careful not to cultivate the roots. Though Azaleas prefer moist well drained soil over-water or wet feet from growing in soil that does not drain well can cause Fusarium wilt which can be detrimental to the plant and future plants as the pathogens remains in the soil.

AZALEAS (July):
Keep azaleas well irrigated now that the weather is warming up. Azaleas are shallow rooted and will dry out quickly. Avoid cultivating or allowing other plants to grow in competition with the roots.

BAMBOO RUNNERS (February):
Plastic root guards and bamboo barriers will help Keep creeping bamboo in its place. (These Barriers are available at Garden View Nursery). It is important that the barrier be placed 1 inch above grade. In January some bamboo runners will try to grow over the top of the barrier. Simply cut them off and remember to do this every January. If you have not done this yet do not procrastinate!

Bamboo BAMBOO SPLITTING (February):
This is the time of year to dig up and split Bamboo. Many varieties can only be done this time of year. At Garden View Nursery we are canning up many different varieties of Bamboo. Remember to use root or bamboo barriers to contain varieties that send out runners or you will be sorry.

BANANA TREES (April):
Before the banana tree fruits, prune so there is only one main stem. After it has been growing for 6-8 months, leave one sucker. This will replace the main stem in the next growing season. After the fruit is removed, cut the main stem down to 2.5'. Remove the rest of the stem in a few weeks, leaving the replacement sucker intact.

Banana trees need lots of water. However, you have to make sure they are not over-watered so you don't get root rot. The soil should be moist but not soggy at all times if possible.

Banana trees should also be fertilized very well. Use a balanced fertilizer once a month. Per the California Rare Fruit Growers organization: "Spread the fertilizer evenly around the plant in a circle extending 4 - 8 feet from the trunk. Do not allow the fertilizer to come in contact with the trunk. Feed container plants on the same monthly schedule using about half the rate for outside plants."

BANANA TREES (May):
Banana trees grow best in a rich, well-drained soil. Salt is not tolerated. Banana trees prefer acidic soil.

Banana trees need lots of water. However, you have to make sure they are not over-watered so you don't get root rot. The soil should be moist but not soggy at all times if possible.

Banana trees should also be fertilized very well. Use a balanced fertilizer once a month. Per the California Rare Fruit Growers organization: "Spread the fertilizer evenly around the plant in a circle extending 4 - 8 feet from the trunk. Do not allow the fertilizer to come in contact with the trunk. Feed container plants on the same monthly schedule using about half the rate for outside plants."

Before the banana tree fruits, prune so there is only one main stem. After it has been growing for 6-8 months, leave one sucker. This will replace the main stem in the next growing season. After the fruit is removed, cut the main stem down to 2.5'. Remove the rest of the stem in a few weeks, leaving the replacement sucker intact.

Rasberries BERRIES (November):
Prune cane berries other than low-chill raspberries.

Give one last deep watering to grapevines and deciduous trees but discontinue feeding. This will begin hardening them off for cold weather. You want to discourage new growth that will be tender and susceptible to damage.

Red Bird of Paradise BIRD OF PARADISE (April):
Red bird of paradise (left) should be pruned in late winter or early spring. Mexican bird of paradise and yellow bird of paradise can also be pruned at that time but should be pruned more sparingly (if at all).

Bird of Paradise BIRD OF PARADISE - Strelitzia reginae (October):
remove stems after flowers have faded. With some care you can split and plant new clumps.

Bougainvillea Bougainvilleas (February) very hard late in the month (after chance of frost has past). Our customers are sometimes shocked at the temporarily sparse looking plant but the prolonged bloom is worth it.

Bougainvillea Rasberry IceBOUGAINVILLEA 'RASBERRY ICE' (June) Don't Prune:
This small more compact form of Bougainvillea grows as a shrub and can be kept contained. Pruning should be kept at a minimum to preserve blooms. If your Bougainvillea (all varieties) is not blooming and it is not because you cut the flowers off you are probably overwatering it. This plant blooms best with minimal water. Also, Bougainvilleas stop growing so fast when you cut back the water.

Brunfelsia BRUNFELSIA (March) - Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow plants have an abundent bloom in spring, The name comes front the flowers tha change color over a three day period. Trim in early spring and periodically to keep compact. The plant likes regular feeding throughout the year.

DO NOT PRUNE CALIFORNIA LIVE OAK TREES (November) until next summer; the tip mildew or “witches broom” disease of the California Live Oak trees is increased by early spring pruning and fertilization.

California Native CALIFORNIA NATIVE PLANTS (July):
Be very cautious irrigating most of our native plants during the summer. Most are adapted to a wet winters and dry summer moisture cycle. Too frequent irrigations now (especially in soils with a clay content) will most likely cause problems.

Calla Lily PLANT BULBS (Calla Lily) (February):
It is time to start tuberous Begonias. Nursery supplies are substantial and fresh now. Other bulbs to look for are Caladium, Calla Lily, Canna, Crocosmia Dahlia, Gloxinia, and Tigridia, and it is not too late for gladiolus. Keep in mind that when the bulbs are finished you are going to have bare space that will need planting.

Camellia Pruning Camellias : (February – March)
According to the American Camilla Society mature Camellias respond well pruning and old overgrown Camellias should be pruned severely (see American Camellia Society article). The Best time to prune is after bloom but Camellias will respond well to pruning any time of year. Late pruning will potentially reduce flower production though.

Garden View crews have found that Camellias respond well to inside out pruning (see Garden View article on inside out pruning) by opening up the plant new growth emerges inside of the plant. It appears blooms are larger and last longer also if the pruning is not to severe.

Carrotwood CARROTWOOD TREES (December):
are blooming now. Some of these trees produce an annoying seed as the tree ages. Unfortunately we can not predict which trees will produce seeds when purchasing them. We can reduce and almost eliminate the seed formation by spraying Floral Fruit Eliminator before flowering ends. The active ingredient, a natural plant hormone called Ethephon, cause the fertilized flowers to fall off so the fruits can't develop.

Cestrum nocturnum NIGHT BLOOMING JESSAMINE -Cestrum nocturnum (November):
This fast growing, arching plant responds well to frequent pruning and a severe pruning in fall. This plants summer flowers are powerfully fragrant at night--too much for some people.

Chondropetalum elephantinum - "Cape Rush" - Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. For a neat appearance, remove old foliage before new leaves emerge. Divide clumps every 2 to 3 years in early spring.

Chrysanthemum CARE FOR CHRYSANTHEMUMS (July):
For the last time, pinch growing tips this month. Continue regular feeding and generous watering.

Chrysanthemums CUT BACK CHRYSANTHEMUMS (November):
When plants have finished blooming, cut them back to within 6 or 8 inches of the ground. If plants are overcrowded, this would be a good time to divide them. Lift clumps, cut roots into pieces, and discard old or woody centers. Replant remaining pieces.

CITRUS (June):
Feed citrus trees again. Mature citrus trees need 1.6 pounds of actual Nitrogen divided into 4 feedings January early March, late April and early June about 6 weeks apart. Feed by putting the fertilizer around the drip line.

Each feeding should be about .4 lbs actual nitrogen. You can get the actual nitrogen amount by checking the first number on the fertilizer analysis on the front of the bag (i.e. 20-6-8) The first number is the percentage of actual nitrogen so to get .4 lbs of actual nitrogen from the 20-6-8 fertilizer you figure each lb of this fertilizer has .2 lbs of actual nitrogen so we need to divide .4 by .2 so we need 2 lbs of fertilizer to get .4 lbs of actual nitrogen.

Coleonema COLEONEMA - BREATH OF HEAVEN (July):
Trim after its main blooming season: Spring and early summer. It still will bloom sporadically through the warm months but you can keep it compact and increase the quality of blooms in the future by pruning now.

Coleus COLEUS (May):
This shade loving perennial is usually treated as an annual. The blue flowered spikes are attractive but they spoil the plants shape and are best pruned out in bud. The pinching also encourages more vigorous leafy compact growth.

PRUNE CORAL TREES (July):
Thin coral trees (Erythrina) now before strong winds in fall. Thinning is important for those growing in lawns or where water is plentiful their growth is faster and wood is softer.

Coreposis Cut back Coreopsis (February)

CrabgrassCRAB GRASS (February) CONTROL ON LAWNS:
This is your last chance to control crabgrass with a pre-emergent herbicide (Herbicides that kill the weed seeds before or as they emerge). As with all chemicals read the directions and follow them exactly.

If you have a crabgrass problem on your lawn it generally indicates you are over-watering. Crabgrass seeds generally germinate in the top ¼” of soil. If the top ¼” of soil is allowed to dry out regularly, (which it should) than the seed can not survive. We at Garden View believe that daily watering of your lawn is counter productive and a waste of water.

Crape Myrtle CREPE MYRTLE TREES -Lagerstroemia (September):
These beautiful low water and long flowering trees need minimum maintenance but it is very important to remove suckers growing from the trunk. If suckers are alloyed to grow the tree may get powdery mildew which looks like it sounds growing on the leaves and the branches. This will be especially profound if the tree is growing in a regular watered lawn.

Cuphea CUPHEA (April):
If it was cold this winter your Cuphea plants might have lost some or much of their leaves. Garden View crews feed Cuphea with a high nitrogen fertilizer and they usually recover quickly.

Cyclamen CARE FOR CYCLAMEN and other GIFT PLANTS (Cyclamen -(December)):
Azaleas, cyclamen, and poinsettia would actually prefer to be outdoors; while they’re in your house, display them in as cool but bright a spot as possible-away from heaters and the fireplace. If pots are trimmed in decorative foil, punch a hole though the wrap or remove it so plants can drain well. Keep soil slightly damp, never soggy.

Though Poinsettias prefer to grow outside the gift poinsettias we purchase in December for holiday color are actually grown in greenhouses under perfect conditions and forced to bloom and produce red leaves in December rather than their natural growth pattern in spring. When placed out doors they are usually very delicate and not acclimated for severe weather conditions. Changes in temperature, over or under water, rain and the cold may lead to their early demise or severely damage the red leaves.

Deciduous Daylilies DECIDUOUS TYPE DAYLILIES (October):
Cut to 4", fertilize and put in snail bait.

Dietes DIETES IRIDIOIDES (May):
To prevent self sowing and prolong bloom break off blossoms individually. Do not cut flower stems because they last more than a year. When they have clearly stopped producing blooms cut stem back to lower leaf joint. (This plant can survive on very minimal water). Do not prune Dietes with a hedge trimmer--cut off dead leaves at base individually, cut off old blooms. This plant can be divided any time of the year but is best done in fall or winterDietes cut with Hedge Trimmer

 

 

 

 

 

Euryops

EURYOPS (May):
This low water use plant blooms almost all year round. Because it is blooming most of the year gardeners are reluctant of pruning it and it can become lanky and unattractive. Garden View gardeners prune the plant several times a year, the flowers are usually not all cut off and the blooms return with increased vigor.

Ficus nitidaFICUS NITIDA/RETUSA HEDGES (June):
This is one of the favorite hedges in Southern California. It grows fast and dense, it needs to be pruned often and planted where roots are not going to be a problem or planted with root guards installed.

Ficus diseaseIt is not unusual to find the leaves of your Ficus hedge curling up as shown to the left. Your plant probably has Thrip. When the leaf pod is opened very tiny white bugs and slightly larger black bugs- still very small become visible. It appears that this does not seem to damage or slow the plants growth down much but it is not aesthetically pleasing. Garden View Maintenance crews spray with Orthene™ or Malathion™ which eliminates the pest. Often we have to spray a couple times a year.

FICUS NITIDA HEDGES AND TREES (April):
To keep this tree as a neat hedge it needs a pruning regularly, don’t let it get away from you and it will stay compact and reduce damage from roots. Garden View Crews do this 4 to 5 times a year.
Fuchsia Cut back Fuchsia (February)

Geranium sanguineum GERANIUM SANGUINEUM (September):
Cut hard now to increase bloom and have a compact plant for the winter.

GRAPES (June):
By thinning newly formed grape clusters you will encourage larger grapes. If you cut out about half of the cluster the plant will put its energy into the remaining grapes making them much larger.

groundcover GROUND COVERS (July):
Trim Vinca Major and other ground covers after they've finished blooming.

Hibiscus HIBISCUS (September):
Stop pruning now so that they are hardened off for winter frost and better blooms next spring. If you have to, give it one more slight pruning now but stop after that for the winter. Garden View gardeners have observed that over fertilized and over-watered Hibiscus are more susceptible to white fly problems.

Honeysuckle Honeysuckle - Lonicera sempervirens (September):
blooms from late spring through much of the summer, prune heavy in early spring and again at end of flowering in September.

DO NOT PRUNE HYDRANGEAS (November): Hydrangea HYDRANGEA (July):
Big leaf type hydrangea set their flower buds at the ends of the upright or lateral branches, during late summer to early fall. Big leaf hydrangea should be pruned as soon as the flowers have faded. Pruning hydrangea in the spring or even late fall, after the buds have been set, will remove the flower buds and any chance of getting flowers that season.
You should begin to see new growth coming in from the base of the plant. To keep the plant vigorous, selectively prune out the dead and weaker stems, both old and new. Don’t prune out all the old wood, since this is what will keep flowering as the new growth matures.

Hydrangeas Prune old flower heads off Hydrangeas (February). Remove the upper third of each stem, but not any lower for the largest blooms this spring. The best blooms come from growth from last years healthy stems. To get the largest blooms reduce the number of flower stems. Otherwise you will get many blooms of smaller size.

Contrary to some references or your own temptations do not prune hydrangeas this late in the year. Hydrangeas bloom on one-year-old stems Pruning now will eliminate most of next year's flowers. To try to get blue or lavender flowers on an otherwise pink plant start applying Aluminum Sulfate to the soil now. White flowered varieties will not change color and not all pinks will be effected the same.

Algerian and English Ivy respond well to a severe pruning during the cooler months. This will keep the plant contained and considerably more attractive.

HYDRANGIA–DON’T PRUNE (April):
Bigleaf type hydrangea set their flower buds at the ends of the upright or lateral branches, during late summer to early fall. Pruning bigleaf hydrangea in the spring or even late fall, after the buds have been set, will remove the flower buds and any chance of getting flowers that season.

Bigleaf hydrangea should be pruned as soon as the flowers have faded. You should begin to see new growth coming in from the base of the plant. To keep the plant vigorous, selectively prune out the dead and weaker stems, both old and new. Don’t prune out all the old wood, since this is what will keep flowering as the new growth matures.

Impatiens TRIM IMPATIENS (October):
Impatiens are generally treated as warm season annuals in Southern California. Trimming Impatiens down to 3"-4" above the ground while the weather is still warm may help impatiens survive or look better during winter months. Impatiens will often survive through the winter in protected areas but even if they survive they usually become leggy and unattractive, showing a lot of stem and very little leaf and flower. The cold weather usually kills the layer of leaf on top of the already leggy plant, this exposes just bare stems. By trimming the impatiens before the cold winter hits the plant sends out a new flush of leaves that are more resistant to the cold and have more layers, so if one layer of leaves gets damaged from frost the next layer still looks acceptable. The trimming may make the impatiens unattractive for a short time but the longer life of the plant should make this short inconvenience worthwhile.

Iris Plant DIVIDE IRIS (July):
Lift, wash, and separate three to four year old clumps of bearded iris. Throw away spongy rhizomes, and let cut ends of healthy rhizomes heal several hours or a day before replanting. Cut tops off leaves to compensate for root loss. Set rhizome top just below soil surface; point the end with leaves in the direction you want growth.

Ivy Geranium IVY GERANIUM (October) responds well to some trimming this month. Feed with a balanced fertilizer. Continue to progressively prune on all types of Geranium. Cut back Geranium sanguin if you have not done it yet.

Jerusalem Sage JERUSALEM SAGE -Phlomis fruticosa (November):
about half in fall to keep them compact. This plant will produce waves of color in spring and summer if cut back lightly after each flowering.

LANTANA (April):
Lantana responds to heavy pruning well. Take the opportunity to prune your lantana down by as much as to within 6-12 inches of ground level. Leaves will re-emerge in spring. Lantana isn't harmed at all by such a drastic pruning, and the result will be more compact lantana shrubs. Another benefit of pruning hard now is that the plants have time to grow and you will avoid pruning off much of the flowers.

Lantana LANTANA (May):
If you have not cut back your Lantana yet this may be a good time to do it. Take the opportunity to prune your lantana down by as much as to within 6-12 inches of ground level. Leaves will re-emerge in spring. Lantana isn't harmed at all by such a drastic pruning, and the result will be more compact lantana shrubs. You will loose some bloom but this plant flowers through most of the summer and with so many other plants blooming now this is your opportunity to keep this sometimes vigorous plant in check and ready for summer bloom. (Lantana is a low water need plant and vigorous bloomer)

LAVANDULA - Lavender (September):
Lavender These plants prefer well drained soil and very little or no fertilizer. To keep the plants neat and compact shear back ⅓ to ½ of the plant immediately after bloom. If the plant becomes woody remove a few of the oldest branches, remove more when new growth comes. If this does not work remove and replace the plant. This plant does best if compost is not put around it. Gravel works good though.

Lavender Plant LaVender (February) DO NOT CUT BACK Most plants that bloom mostly in early spring. This includes Lavender (right)

Leptospermum NEW ZEALAND TEA TREES AND SHRUBS -Leptospermum (September):
Don’t prune in Fall. This plant has magnificent blooms in Spring trimming in fall will reduce the abundance of blooms. This is an easy to maintain, low water need plant. Best if grown in well draining soil. Watch that they don't get overwatered in clay soil as they may get a root rot.

Liriope Plant LIRIOPE (April):
Clean the dead leaves out of your Liriope plants now. They will be much more attractive and the new growth will fill in nicely.

Magnolia Plant MAGNOLIA STELLATA (May), and other early spring flowering trees:
The best time to prune most flowering trees is soon after they finish blooming. Don’t sheer or top the trees. Selectively prune the crisscrossing branches and prune to shape.

PRUNE NATIVES (Fuchsia - (December)): Cut California fuchsia (Zauschneria californica), Coast sunflower (Encelia californica), Matilija poppy, and needle grass (Nassella) nearly to the ground. Prune Cleveland sage, coyote mint (Monardella villosa), and Island bush snap-dragon (Galvezia speciosa) more lightly: about one-third.

Matilija Poppy Plant WATER NATIVES (Matilijia poppy - (December)):
This is the growing season for California Natives so if the weather is dry water these plants.

Oleander At Garden View Landscape Maintenance we trim large shrubs that bloom from the end of their new growth this month. We cut back Oleander (February) very far so that it does not need trimming again for most of the year. (When you trim Oleander you cut off all the flowers). For the same reason we usually trim mature

Cercidium Plant PALO VERDE (May) Cercidium and mesquite:
Limit pruning of desert legume trees such as Palo Verde and mesquite. Just remove dead or very small limbs as necessary. Heavy pruning, to stimulate new growth which will be stressed by oncoming heat should wait until later in the summer.

Geranium Plant PELARGONIUMS - GERANIUMS (July):
Remove faded flowers regularly to encourage new blooms.

Penisetum Plant TRIM GRASSES LIKE PENISETUM SETACEUM ‘RUBRUM’ (November) when they are starting to go brown. Cut down the whole plant (which is all leaves). Garden View crews cut to approximately 4” above the soil. If you do no do this the plant will be extremely unattractive all winter and will be much too large next spring and summer.
PhotiniaPHOTINIA (right):
has finished blooming and its new flush red leaves are now no longer new and flush. It is a good time to prune this shrub to keep it compact.

Conifers PINE TREES (November):
Prune Pine trees and other conifers now through February.

DON’T PANIC IF EVERGREENS (Pine trees and other conifers) continue to show some browning or yellowing of needles this month and next. The oldest, innermost ones typically shed after a few years on the tree.

Pine needles can be used as mulch for acid loving plants like Azalea, Camellia, and Blueberries or to cover informal woodland or vegetable garden paths.
Pittosporum tobira (February) takes well to trimming this month as well. This is a good plant to trim inside out and let a little light inside.

Pittosporum PlantPITTOSPORUM TOBIRA (May) Don't Prune Now:
Try not to prune this plant now, though the flowers are apparent but relatively inconspicuous they enrich the garden with a beautiful aroma. There are several types of Pittosporum tobira. Some are variegated. This is a very dependable low maintenance plant.

Cape PlumbagoPlumbago (January / February)
Prune back hard in January or February to keep compact.





Podocarpus Tree

PRUNE PODOCARPUS and other evergreens (Podocarpus gracilior - (December)):
Many evergreen trees and shrubs benefit from a light winter grooming. Prune to shape cedar, cotoneaster, fir, juniper, magnolia, pine, pittosporum, podocarpus, pyracantha, and viburnum.

Rhaphiolepis RHAPHIOLEPIS (November):
Do not trim until after their spring blooms. Most varieties of these low water need, disease and pest resistant plants are compact growers needing little pruning.

Rhaphiolepis Plant RHAPHIOLEPIS (May):
After this beautiful, low maintenance, low water use plant has finished blooming it is a good time to do minimal pruning. Once this plant reaches its mature size it is slow growing and probably only needs to be cut once a year with a little inside out pruning to let light inside the plant and to keep its natural form.
Rose of Sharon PlantROSE OF SHARON (April):
Though it is naturally a multi-stemmed shrub, Rose of Sharon can be trained to have a single trunk, looking more like a tree. It can also be trained as an espalier or shaped into a hedge.

Prune as needed to maintain the shape desired. In winter or early spring, last season's growth should be pruned away, which will help produce bigger blooms.

Salvia Plant If you have not trimmed your Salvias (February) yet it is a good time to do it.

Salvia Plant SALVIA LEUCANTHA:
This plant has abundant blooms for a long season. Prune sparingly now to limit plant size and renew flower stems. Limit watering now to enough to keep it alive, it may be able to survive nicely on watering only once every two weeks. Remove blossoms as soon as they fade. Cut back to 1 foot above grade after blooming is done or in early spring. Can cut back water to once every other week in winter . To keep compact cut back again in summer to 2 feet.

Santa Barbara Daisy SANTA BARBARA DAISY - Erigeron karvinskianus (October):
Cut back and fertilize it after it finishes blooming. Garden View Crews usually do this twice a year. This is a great low growing creeping ground cover that is water wise.

Trachelosperumum Plant STAR JASMINE - Trachelospermum (May) Don't Prune Now:
This very versatile, popular plant is just starting to flower. Garden View crews prune this plant only when absolutely necessary at this time of year so that you can enjoy the beautiful flowers and wonderful scent. Star Jasmine can be used and trained as a ground cover, shrub or vine.

Potted Succulents POTTED SUCCULENTS (September):
Feed with a well diluted liquid fertilizer.

ROSES (September):
Cool fall days bring out some of the year's best rose blooms. Many rosarians insist that fall roses have deeper color and spicier fragrance than spring blooms. To keep blossoms coming, continue to water and cut off spent flowers regularly, however, don't fertilize plants until next spring.

SYCAMORE TREES, FRUIT TREES (September) and many other trees will be showing excessive leaf drop during the heat. They are not able to move enough water from the ground to the leaf and/or fruit. To protect itself the tree drops leaves and fruit. This is ok and natural. The fewer fruit will result in better and larger fruit at harvest time. Adding more water may not help. Trees that have been grown with frequent watering thus producing smaller roots will be more likely to have leaf drop. Most large trees appreciate an occasional deep watering. This will increase the debt of the roots system, the storage capacity of the tree and many benefits.

Mexican Marigold Prune Tagetes lucida - Mexican Marigold (February) this time of month. Generally we cut in half.

Verbina Also cut back Verbina - groundcover (February)

Vinca MinorVinca minor and Vincor major(February and March)
Do not trim in February or March so that you can enjoy the flowers. If Bees are a problem for you trim the ground covers to reduce blooms and bees

Wisteria Vine WISTERIAS (July):
On established plants, this is the time of the first of three annual prunings. A good schedule for these three prunings is June, August and December. Cut any and all unwanted new growth to three buds above last years resting point. The point where the current years growth began and last years ended can be located by noticing the change in the stem/bark color. This pruning should be done to encourage flower bud development and to contain the size of the plant.